Tag Archives: italian riviera

A Weekend in Palermo, Sicily

Ciao everyone! As most of you know, I have spent most of July and August working on finishing our Italian house renovation. It’s been 2 years of lots of blood, sweat, tears and $$$$, but it is beautiful and worth all the effort. (Read about the renovation here).

Since I have not had a lot of time this year to travel to places I’ve not been in Italy, I decided, like many Italians, to take a weekend during holiday time known as Ferragosto. Most Italians take this time to travel and be with family mid-August. Since my family is not around, I thought that going with my workshop chef, Teri, would be fun, and we could eat our way through the large metropolis of Palermo, Sicily. Teri is Italian, and like many American Italians, she has roots in Sicily.

We rented an Air B&B. Full disclosure: this was not my choice, and I suggest if you’re only going for a weekend and not planning on cooking or buying groceries, a hotel is the way to go. Staying in a hotel also gives one the opportunity to use the concierge services, and if you’re not familiar with a city, it’s a great help. Since we were not familiar with Palermo, I had to do a lot of research about what to see and what was open and of interest in August.

fullsizeoutput_55fc

Of course we had to hit the markets. There are 3 main open air markets, and since it was August, they were smaller, so we could see them all in one morning and then head to lunch.

Ballarò: Located a few steps from the Martorana Church and Quattro Canti, the Ballarò market extends from Piazza Ballarò in the Albergheria district (near the medieval church of San Nicolò) along Via Ballarò past Piazza Carmine toward Corso Tukory, roughly parallel to Via Maqueda toward the main train station.

Capo: The Capo market, located behind the Teatro Massimo, extends from Via Porta Carini off Via Volturno near the old city wall toward Piazza Beati Paoli and can also be reached from Via Sant’Agostino, which runs off Via Maqueda, though this section includes various vendors of dry goods and articles rather than food. In many respects, this is the most “atmospheric” and “complete” of Palermo’s street markets.

Vucciria: The Vucciria (from the Norman French “boucherie”), perhaps the favorite Palermitan market for visitors, begins at Piazza San Domenico, off Via Roma, running parallel to Via Roma (from which it is hidden) along Via Maccheronai toward Piazza Caracciolo and Corso Vittorio Emanuele, branching off along Via Argenteria. It is much smaller than the other two markets, having lost many merchants in recent years, it is but a shadow of its former self.

I was so struck by how much the markets reminded me of Marrakech. The Arabic influence in Palermo, especially in the market, was so interesting and made it lively and colorful.

IMG_2047

For those of you who love flea markets, there is a great area not to be missed. It’s on Piazza Domenico Peranni and it’s delightful.

With the exception of some Norman-Arab architecture and a number of words in the Sicilian language, the markets are perhaps the best-preserved of Sicily’s Arab traditions. Following in the footsteps of their medieval predecessors, Sicily’s new North African immigrants — a growing presence in Palermo — feel perfectly at home here, and are beginning to establish businesses in the Palermitan “souks.” Palermo is truly a melting pot of not only flavors but cultures.


I suggest you take a tour around town in a surrey like vehicle called an Ape (pronounced Apae). Reserve yours here . I found it was a great way to get a sense of the city in an hour, and they are a blast! Palermo has gorgeous architecture from a fusion of Arab and Norman styles which makes the landscape ethnic and eclectic. Read more about the history here. Safe to say it was stunning.

A word about food: The markets have many street food vendors. They make a variety of Sicilan specialties, like fried chick pea cakes served as a sandwich, lots of offal fried as well. Along any street you can find Arancini the symbol of  Sicilian street food. An Arancino is a saffron rice ball stuffed with a filling like cheese, ragu or sausage breaded and fried. It’s basically Italian junk food. Katie Parla does a great job describing the offerings of offial, anancini, pastries and the rest read about it here.

Since it was August, the markets were downsized, so not a lot of street food was really available. However, we did find the most amazing place while walking to the Botanical Gardens our last day. Thanks to my eagle eye (when it comes to food and props:-)), I noticed all the locals holding a arancino the size of their head filled with piping hot ragu, I said to myself I gotta try one. Full disclosure: since we did not have the best introduction to arancino, even though our AirB&B host gave us a list of local favorites, the street food for me was underwhelming. And a little warning: if you’re not a fan of fried food or cheese filled desserts (which I am not), you may not love the food here. Although there is a great selection of seafood and yummy pastas for those not too keen on eating street food. Bar Touring serves the Arancino Bomba, and it is truly the bomb in every sense of the word. It was the best arancino I tried the entire weekend.

My suggestion is to have one, then walk it off it the beautiful Botanical Gardens, and in midday in the heat of the day, it is a lovely, shaded wander indeed.

IMG_2045

We did find a terrific place to perch to have an aperitivo or 2 in a very patina-ed part of the city. Bar Garabaldi has a lively crowd and great bar menu.

Note: taxis are not cheap, so if you dare, rent a car. It’s cheaper than taxis and is a great way to drive out of the heat of the city and to one of the many beach towns on the island. I did just that. I rented a car, and I drove us to Cefalu a gorgeous beach town about a 1 hour drive. Once you make your way out of Palermo, it’s quite a pleasant trip. Parking was quite easy, too. You just wind down to the boardwalk, and there is a big parking area. We grabbed lunch on the seaside, and then headed to one of the many beach clubs to enjoy the breeze and the sea. I highly recommend it.

IMG_2023

It’s safe to say I will go back. I really feel like I just dipped my baby toe into the Sicilian landscape and all it has to offer. A weekend trip is too little time to explore this beautiful island.

xx Annette

 

 

All italy Notes from Italy Personal Travel Uncategorized Workshops : Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Flea-ing and Finding Workshop with Lisa Burnett

Ciao guys! If you followed my instagram stories, you know that I spent a week last month showing Lisa Burnett from Innerpieces around the Italian countryside and the seaside. Lisa is an antiques dealer in Atlanta. I have been buying from her for almost 20 years, and she has a warehouse and shows at Scotts and Americasmart, as well as Roundtop. She’s the real deal. She has an amazing eye and the best part is the after such a long relationship, I now call her a dear friend. When I proposed doing a flea market tour here in Italy, she jumped at the chance, so here we are planning her workshop for 2019.

We will have her here for 5 days of flea-ing, picking and honing your eye. If you’re interested, email me annette@annettejosephstyle.com. We are almost sold out, and we don’t even have a date yet. We are zeroing in on early September of 2019 because it is the best time of year in this area, the Lunigiana. We will be posting registration in November for 2019 workshops here at La Fortezza , so stay tuned!

Forrest and I showed Lisa so many wonderful places. We will be putting together an amazing list of activities, including a cooking lesson, and of course dinner and a movie on the terrace. Keep an eye on the blog for more information coming your way soon. In the meantime, enjoy a few photos from our excursion last week.

xx Annette

fullsizeoutput_53f0 fullsizeoutput_53ee 7c319103-b1cf-49af-bc82-9b23f8c9ff8f IMG_1646   fullsizeoutput_5410 IMG_1692

All behind the scenes color for the home Decor Design Inspiration home furnishings Instagram interior design italy Personal secrets on how to become a stylist stylist tips The Fortress Travel Tuscany Uncategorized up-cycle Workshops : Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Summer Cocktails: Americano Shakerato

Portofino_Americano Shakerato_010

Today I’ve got a fun summer cocktail for you, the Americano Shakerato. Shakerato simply means “shaken.” Shaken vigorously. The agitation of drinks forms a desired foam, and this technique is used in many classic drinks to add a little foam. Almost anything can be a shakerato!

Give it a try, or any other recipes from Cocktail Italiano, and let me know what you think!

American Shakerato
serves 1

You will need:

1.5 ounces sweet vermouth
1.5 ounces campari
– 1 orange peel

To prepare:

Chill a martini glass with ice, then discard the ice.

Place the vermouth and Campari into a cocktail shaker filled with ice, shake, and strain into the chilled martini glass. Garnish with an orange peel.

xx Annette

All campari celebration Cocktail Italiano Cocktail of the Week Cocktails Entertaining italy mixology Recipes specialty cocktails Uncategorized : Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Fun Summer Italian Cocktail :: The Beer Americano

Italian Cocktails and food

Something you may not know about me…I love beer, so when I discovered this Italian summer cocktail, you can imagine I was quite thrilled. Beer combined with 2 of my favorite Italian spirits = mind blown. I think you will love adding this to your summer cocktail arsenal. Try it; you’ll like it. Of course it pairs perfectly with the salty goodness of potato chips. Look for this and other amazing summer cocktails in my new book Cocktail Italiano!

Beer Americano
Serves 1

This is a cocktail that has become very popular all along the Riviera. Substituting beer for the soda makes this a very refreshing summer choice. It was created in Milan for the opening of the Trussardi Flagship Store by resident bartender Tommaso Cecca. Perfect for a sweltering summer evening. I love it.

You will need:
– 1 ½ ounces Campari
– 1 ½ ounces sweet vermouth
– 3 ounces lager beer
– lemon zest, for garnish

To prepare:

Combine Campari, vermouth and ices cubes in a tall tumbler, stir to combine. Pour the beer into another glass, stir to create a stiff foam, reserve the foam with a spoon top the cocktiail with the beer foam, about 3 ounces.

**Note: For a lighter Americano feel free to pour 2 ounces of the beer in to the cocktail as well. However, this should be done before you top the cocktail with the foam.

xx Annette

All campari Cocktail Italiano Cocktail of the Week Cocktails cookbook collection Entertaining italian cooking italian riviera italy mixology Notes from Italy Recipes Uncategorized : Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Delicious Cocktail Italiano Appetizer:: Eggplant Camponata

 

If you’ve received your copy of Cocktail Italiano, you now know that it’s not only filled with cocktails but also delicious appetizers. In the section on Imperia, an industrial town along the coast, you’ll find three classic cocktails and several nibble recipes. This eggplant camponata is one of them. Camponata is one of my favorite, stand by appetizers. It’s creamy, spicy, salty, and of course, eggplant-y. It’s divine.

I like to serve mine with thin crackers or crostini, along with arugula and grape tomatoes. Plate it all with a touch of grated Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of the best olive oil you have. Enjoy!

Eggplant Camponata

This has been my favorite tried-and-true apero recipe for many years. I make a lot, and I keep it in the fridge for unexpected guests. It’s also an amazing topping for pizza, another great aperitivo snack!

You will need:

– 1/4 cup olive oil
– 1 small red onion, finely chopped
– 4 cloves of garlic, crushed or coarsely chopped
– 4 cups of cubed eggplant, skin on (1″ cubes)
– 1 cup chopped tomatoes
– 1 cup chopped fresh basil
– 1/4 cup capers
– 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
– 1/2 cup tomato sauce (from a jar is fine, unless you have homemade hanging around)
– 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
– salt and pepper to taste
– Parmesan cheese for garnish
– Crispy crackers or flat crostini (find this recipe in Cocktail Italiano, too!)

To prepare:

In a large pan, saute chopped onions and garlic in olive oil until translucent. Add all other ingredients, except Parmesan cheese. Cover and stir frequently, so camponata does not stick. Saute on low heat until combined and soft, about 30-40 minutes.

Serve as a warm appetizer on crisp crackers and plate with arugula and tomatoes. Enjoy alongside cold white or sparkling wine with friends.

xx Annette

All Cocktail Italiano cookbook collection cooking dinner party Entertaining italian cooking italian riviera italy Notes from Italy Parties photography quick appetizers Recipes Travel Uncategorized : Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,